Gen Z has used voice technology 67% more since the pandemic started, of which 70% are 10–15-year-old boys. That’s according to recent research which evaluates the habits of Gen Z pre- and post-pandemic.[1] It found that between 40-50% of Gen Z use voice technology assistants, of which two-thirds use theirs daily.

Adding to their increased technology usage, the report found an astounding 287% growth in TikTok use across 16–18-year-olds since the beginning of the pandemic. The research further reveals that Gen Z spends roughly 9 hours on YouTube per week. More generally, the research saw a 54% uplift in time spent online across Gen Z’s female demographic, compared to 30% across their male counterparts.

Interestingly, the pandemic has caused a resurgence in Facebook, WhatsApp and Twitter, particularly across the 10-15 year-old age bracket. Pre-pandemic, their use of these channels had all but eclipsed, so it’s possible that the need to connect with family and ‘formal’ groups – school, hobbies – caused these channels to find a new niche with this younger demographic.

When asking Gen Z what they look forward to the most post-COVID 19, girls aged 16+ responded that they wish to see the world and share their journey on social channels; boys of the same age simply want to have a blast with their friends. All Gen Z in the research wanted to be eco-conscious but added that they would not sacrifice the prospect of travel to become so.

Further research found that as a highly eco-conscious demographic, all of Gen Z age 16+ want brands to improve their eco credentials and social impact; a quarter of boys aged 10-15 and girls age 16+ will actively choose brands based on their eco-credentials.[2] Nearly a quarter (22%) of 19–22-year-olds, and 28% of 10–15-year-olds want a brand to stand for something they believe. Admiring more ‘worthy’ personalities, those aged 16-22 were found to idolise ‘respectable’, socially conscious names such as David Attenborough, Michelle Obama, and Greta Thunberg.

The research has been commissioned by The Lucre Group as part of an ongoing study  to gain further insight into the mindset of Gen Z, particularly in the context of the COVID pandemic and their interaction with visual culture and society.

Tamarind Wilson Flint, Co-Founder of The Lucre Group said:

“Understanding how different audiences consume media and engage is key in a normal world, never mind against a backdrop of a global pandemic. To our knowledge, this is the only study of its kind to monitor Gen Z pre, during and post COVID, the insights of which offer a unique behavioural blueprint for businesses and brands. From identifying where technology has accelerated in usage to the green generation, this research helps us to comprehend on a granular level what is fundamentally important to Gen Z – alongside their means of communicating and interacting.”